Eli Levine Goldberg — UX/UI Designer based in New York, NY

AR birdhouse: mobile app

UX/UI Design

This app is not really about birdhouses, the details of the actual app were changed due to confidentiality issues.

THE CHALLENGE:
Companies need to get authorization to place poles and birdhouses in cities and on private properties. This process requires a visual mockup of the planned installment, which usually takes a long time to produce.

THE SOLUTION:
We created a mobile app that uses AR technology in order to place a virtual pole or a birdhouse in an existing environment. In a few clicks, a technician on the field can produce a realistic mockup and submit it to approval.

THE TEAM:
Product manager
UX/UI designer – That’s me!
3D UX designer
3D artist
Unity developer
Mobile developer

ForVerizon RoleUX/UI design
Date2019

UX PROCESS

Each of the next steps was presented to the clients in order to incorporate them in the process and get their approval. The whole process included close collaboration with 3D professionals, since the app included both 2D and 3D interactions.

Each sprint included new features to add to the app, so the cycle of requirements > user flow > prototype > delivery > testing repeated itself on each phase.

USER RESEARCH

In this project, the clients also represented the end users, so we could gather information about their current behavior patterns, their pain points and their needs. We could create personas describing their technological abilities, their equipment and routine. The fact that the type of users is similar and the outcome is clear, allowed us to create a highly focused app in a short time.

STEP 1: WRITHING REQUIREMENTS

The client expressed a list of needs, which were translated to a list of usability requirements.
After defining all the features we need, we had to decide which ones are essential for the MVP version, and which ones will be developed in the next phases.

STEP 2: DRAWING APP ARCHITECTURE AND WIREFRAMES

The main goal here was to simplify the process of selecting a 3D asset from a list, scanning the ground to activate AR, placing the model and adjusting it. Finally, the users may change the asset’s color, view info and share the photo.
The process was introduced by 3 simple steps until completion, to allow even less technical savvy users to operate the app.
In later versions, placing a birdhouse on an existing pole or wall has raised more challenges, which required us to create a more complex solution, while maintaining a simple and friendly user flow.

STEP 3: DESIGNING PROTOTYPES

Finally, designing the app screens included setting a visual styleguide, building and placing each element, according to the usability principles that were defined in the previous steps. This step included also interactions and animations that were later delivered to development.

STEP 4: DELIVERY AND REQUIREMENTS FOR DEVELOPMENT

All the screens, along with graphic elements, were uploaded to Zeplin and a designated folder. Each version included a page with specified requirements for each screen – elements on the screen, actions, usability options – along with a link to each prototype and full app user flow.

STEP 5: USABILITY TESTING

Given the complexity of the app, actual user testing could be performed only after the AR function works properly. During the building of the app on Unity we could test it in the office, but after the build was done we could get feedback from real users on the field. The results of the test proved that many of our decisions were correct, while some of the comments reuired iterations and changes that we implemented in the next versions.